Activities of Daily Living and the Need for Long-Term Care

Most long-term care involves assisting with basic personal needs rather than providing medical care. The long-term care community measures personal needs by looking at whether an individual requires help with basic activities.

 

ADLs Meaning

ADLs, or activities of daily living, are six basic activites that most people do every day without assistance. ADLs are important to understand because they are used to gauge an individual’s level of functioning. This, in turn, determines whether the individual qualifies for assistance like Medicaid or has triggered long-term care insurance coverage.   

 

What Are Some ADL Examples?

The six ADLs are generally recognized as:

  • Bathing. The ability to clean oneself and perform grooming activities like shaving and brushing teeth.  

  • Dressing. The ability to get dressed by oneself without struggling with buttons and zippers.

  • Eating. The ability to feed oneself.

  • Transferring. Being able to either walk or move oneself from a bed to a wheelchair and back again.

  • Toileting. The ability to get on and off the toilet.

  • Continence. The ability to control one’s bladder and bowel functions.

Instrumental Activities of Daily Living

There are other more complicated tasks that are important to living independently, but aren’t necessarily required on a daily basis. These are called instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) and include the following:

  • Using a telephone

  • Managing medications

  • Preparing meals

  • Housekeeping

  • Managing personal finances

  • Shopping for groceries or clothes

  • Accessing transportation

  • Caring for pets

Long-term care providers use ADLs and IADLs as a measure of whether assistance is required and how much assistance is needed. In order to qualify for Medicaid nursing home benefits, the state may do an assessment to verify that an applicant needs assistance with ADLs. Other state assistance programs also may require that an applicant be unable to perform a certain number of ADLs before qualifying. In addition, long-term care insurance usually uses the inability to perform two or more ADLs as a trigger to begin paying on the policy.  

To learn more about long-term care and Medicaid, feel free to contact us for a Long-Term Care Consult which is specific to your situation and assets. You can contact us at (989) 356-6128 to schedule a consult.

If you have specific questions about your situation or would like to learn more, reach out to the team at WBH here.

Read more articles:

What Is Hospice Care at Home?

Hospice care is a type of health care that patients with terminally ill conditions rely on at the end of their lives. This type of care focuses on pain management and emotional, spiritual, and familial support for patients nearing the end of their lives. There are...

Why You May Need a Trust in Addition to a Power of Attorney

While everyone should have a durable power of attorney that appoints someone to act for them if they become incapacitated, in some circumstances, it is not enough. In these cases, a revocable trust can help.  A durable power of attorney allows you to appoint someone...

Why Hire an Elder Law Attorney?

Elder law attorneys may specialize in estate planning, incapacity planning, and end-of-life care for seniors. They also help older adults remain in their homes as they age and protect them from abuse.      These practitioners are essential because they work to protect...

When Can Someone Be Declared Legally Incompetent?

If a loved one is experiencing memory loss or suddenly making poor decisions, you may be in a situation where it becomes necessary to ask the probate court to appoint a guardian and/or a conservator for them. This is a complicated process, so we strongly encourage our...

Why Small Business Owners Need an Estate Plan

Running a small business can keep you busy, but it should not keep you from creating an estate plan. Not having a plan in place can cause problems for your business and your family after you are gone.   While an estate plan is important for everyone, it is especially...

Estate Planning: An At-a-Glance Overview

Estate planning, or legacy planning, entails preparing your affairs for the future, including death and other life events. While older adults might give more thought to estate planning, it is an essential tool at any age. Why It’s Important With estate planning,...

In 2022, Social Security Beneficiaries Will See the Biggest Increase in 39 Years

The year was 1983: The U.S. invaded Granada. A gallon of gas cost 96 cents. Michael Jackson’s ‘Thriller’ video premiered. That year was also the last time that Social Security recipients saw a cost-of-living increase steeper than the one just announced for 2022. This...

Start 2023 Prepared: Reassess What Matters Most

If we have learned anything these past few years, it’s that life is fleeting. Amid such uncertain times, many of us have realized what – and who – truly means the most to us. Estate planning allows you to reflect on your family, your priorities, and what actions you...

CMS: Medicare Will Soon Cover Certain Alzheimer’s Treatments

Medicare recipients living with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s recently received promising news: The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has announced that it would begin covering new Alzheimer’s treatments that receive approval from the FDA. “If the FDA...

What Are Veterans Death Benefits?

Although death benefits are available to veterans, as well as their families and veterans who did not engage in combat, less than half of those who are eligible for death benefits use them, according to the American Association of Retired People. Available veterans...