11 Things You Can Do Online Via the Social Security Website

The Social Security Administration (SSA) website hosts a wealth of online tools that offer you convenient access to benefits information. To make the most of these tools, simply create a my Social Security account online. It is free to set up a mySSA account.

More than 65 million people are currently collecting Social Security benefits. Whether or not you are already receiving these benefits, there are numerous services you may be able to take advantage of through the SSA website. These include the following:

  1. Determine whether you are eligible for Social Security – in less than 10 minutes.
  2. Apply for Social Security benefits (Gather all the details that you’ll need to complete the application process, including your bank account information, recent employment history, your Social Security number, your spouse’s Social Security number, and the names of your eligible children).
  3. Check on the status of your application.
  4. Update changes to your name, phone number, email address, or mailing address.
  5. Replace your Social Security card if you’ve misplaced it, damaged it, or have had it stolen.
  6. Review your Social Security statements (View a sample statement).
  7. Get a personalized estimate of how much your monthly retirement benefit will be, based on your age.
  8. Secure proof of your benefits with a verification letter (also known as a proof of income letter or benefits letter).
  9. Set up direct deposit for your monthly benefit check (or update your banking information).
  10. Complete the application process for disability benefits.
  11. See the schedule for your upcoming, as well as your past, benefits payments.

How Much Can I Expect to Get in Social Security Benefits?

It depends, and the amount also typically adjusts a bit each year.

The maximum amount you can receive per month once you are at full retirement age is $3,627, as of 2023. Note that, on average, retired workers are receiving considerably less that that – $1,827 per month in 2023.

The SSA announces its annual cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) each fall for the upcoming year. In large part due to inflation, the COLA for 2023 saw its biggest increase in Social Security benefits in more than four decades – almost 9 percent.

How much you will receive depends on factors such as:

  • the length of your work history,
  • your age,
  • how much you earned during your employment,
  • whether you’re still working,
  • and, in some cases, the state where you reside.

To learn more or to create an account, visit the mySSA account homepage. It is important to havy easy access to information about your social security benefits for many reasons. For those clients who are seeking benefits through the Medicaid program for long-term care, we have found it very helpful to them to be able to access information through their online SSA account in order to provide the information that is required in applying for Medicaid. If you or a loved one are planning for long-term care, please feel free to contact us at (989) 356-6128 for a Long-Term Care consult with our elder law attorney and paralegal.

If you have specific questions about your situation or would like to learn more, reach out to the team at WBH here.

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